1776 book review

Only in a revolution, and especially a can-do American revolution, could this Billy Bunter turn into a wonderful general who began by thinking up and carrying through the mad feat of towing the guns from Ticonderoga and ended up as one of the victors at Yorktown. At the end of that year, he assumed that the British, who had chased him all the way from New York, were about to cross the Delaware river and capture Philadelphia, capital of the revolution.

He was courageous, persistent, resolute, indefatigable, although he was also sometimes depressed and indecisive. The best thing about the book is that McCullough delivers the history as a story.

The minus is the lack of political background, which is perfunctory.

He who hesitates...

And the most amazing character of all is that of General George Washington, who volunteered to leave his comfortable mansion at Mount Vernon to lead the ragtag mob. You've probably heard that public education in America is becoming more of a shambles each decade.

Do the British eventually cut their losses and give up on their colony, or do they own them still. While we have a number of good students, we also have a fair number and year-olds who simply aren't prepared for higher education and who, if the economy weren't so degree-oriented, probably wouldn't choose to go to college at all.

When Washington wrote those words, he did not know that General Howe, the British commander, had already decided that it was getting too cold to carry on fighting. Do the Americans win the war, or are they driven further and further west until they have to admit defeat.

They very nearly did. It tells the story of an important period of time in a way that is accessible to those who may not wish to read a scholarly treatment of the same material. You will discover that, although ultimately he became a great general, Washington by no means started that way.

I think this is a travesty, and it's not just the students who are being cheated — it is all of society, because without an educated citizenry we are lost.

McCullough does place emphasis on Washington, but the entire book does not revolve around Washington. People familiar with the American Revolution or just America in general know about George Washington, and some may even be familiar with General Cornwallis of the British. Like Washington, he had never fought in a battle until he entered the war.

Book Review: “1776” by David McCullough

America was already independent. Yet this year, being so pivotal, mirrors the course of the war, for it began with defeat and retreat, but ended with great victories.

An English professor was making a point about how people today rely so much on their smartphones and the Internet that no one bothers to remember anything anymore because they assume they can just Google it.

SuperSummary, a modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, offers high-quality study guides for challenging works of literature. This event happened in the midst of the American Revolutionary War, which is the focus of McCullough's book.

Another reason I thought the book moved well was because of the inclusion of the personal histories of the men in charge of each military.

1776 Summary

Dustin is the founder and co-owner of Pajiba. The American witnesses are wonderfully observant and articulate; they were mostly well-educated volunteers who already 'enjoyed a higher standard of living than any people in the world', as McCullough reminds us.

It opens with a quote from a letter written by General George Washington in January This review is part of the Cannonball Read series. What were their own dreams for America and what happened to them in the end.

Buy from Amazon I have only elementary knowledge of American history.

Review of 1776, by David McCullough - Book Report/Review Example

And some histories are indeed quite boring, even if vital. You may email him here or follow him on Twitter. But it was as exciting and fascinating as a novel. OK, boys and girls, America was founded on July 4,when the Declaration of Independence was approved by the Continental Congress.

His wife stepped up to take his place, one of the few women to see action during the Revolutionary War, and held her ground until she became too wounded to continue. The plus is that McCullough is offering one more irresistible narrative of a fabled Long March, from hope through despair to hope again, which is the tale of Xenophon and many others.

But Washington was wrong, as he frequently was about military things. If their treason be suffered to take root, much mischief must grow from it. The plus is that McCullough is offering one more irresistible narrative of a fabled Long March, from hope through despair to hope again, which is the tale of Xenophon and many others.

This book is the story of how close George Washington, as commander of the American army, came to defeat in the terrible year of which also saw the Declaration of Independence.

We owe so much, but tend these days to think only in terms of what we are supposedly owed. The best thing about the book is that McCullough delivers the history as a story.

He who hesitates...

It is good to see both Mayflower and on the bestseller lists at the same time. by David McCullough - America’s beloved and distinguished historian presents, in a book of breathtaking excitement, drama, and narrative force, the stirring Released on: July 04, Book Review: “United in Hate: The Left’s Romance with Tyranny and Terror” by Jamie Glazov About Brad Nelson I like books, nature, politics, old movies, Ronald Reagan (you get sort of a three-fer with that one), and the founding ideals of this country.

This book is the story of how close George Washington, as commander of the American army, came to defeat in the terrible year of which also saw the Declaration of .Book Review It was a good year for a revolution, But it didn't start off quite as well as the colonists would have liked.

When George Washington agreed to take command of the American forces inhe probably didn't realize what he was truly getting himself into.by David McCullough, represents a sea change in the work of one of America's truly extraordinary historians.

O'er the Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave

The two-time Pulitzer Prize winner and twice National Book Award recipient has traditionally chronicled epic times and critical historical events on a grand scale.

May 22,  · By David McCullough. Illustrated. pp. Simon & Schuster. $ THIS is a sly book, beginning with its title, "" It's a story of war, not words -- the great declaration in Philadelphia.

1776 book review
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Observer review: by David McCullough | Books | The Guardian